AMER I CAN!

Good day to all!  Welcome to this week’s The Traveling Foody blog.  It’s Amer I “can” not Amer I “can’t.”  Why am I talking this way?   Well, today many of us American’s are celebrating the adoption of our independence.  With the invention of the internet we are able to share what this day means to us and to other nations.  It’s an awesome feeling to be free and be able to open up and share knowledge and culture between people from all nations.  I like to invite all our travelers and Foody lovers all over the globe to celebrate with us the joy each other’s stories and recipes which will bring all of us closer together.  I must add that I am grateful for my life on this beautiful earth and being able to share this earth with you, my family and friends.

 

North American food is as diverse as the land. In recent years North America has seen more sustainable farms popping up and pushing away from corporate and government subsidized farming.  People are willing to pay a little more for quality local foods.  The turn of the 19th and 20th centuries brought to light an influx of immigrants who developed a rich assortment of food preparation throughout the region.  From the Pacific coast to the Atlantic, North America has been a melting pot of cultures.  The vast rich farmland of North America provides people the perfect conditions for farming various fruits, grains, vegetables, and livestock.  The Pacific and Atlantic oceans also provide people with bountiful treats from the sea.  The combination of the North American topography and culture will astound the traveler.  North American cuisine will continue to fuse new and old traditions.

I would like to share with you some strange facts about food and about America.  Included in this week’s blog are recipes from the North American section of my book, Around the World in 80 Recipes.  Thank you to my good friends, Ben and Rachel Shelton, for letting us use their kitchen and for the beautiful photos they were able to capture for the book.

You can purchase the book at http://www.amazon.com/Damien-T.-De-Witte/e/B0080YZEU4.  For more information on upcoming books visit http://thetravelingfoody.com.

 

Strange facts:

Apple rock!  Why?  They are more efficient at waking you up in the morning.

There were 57 varieties of pickles Heinz ketchup produced.  Now you know why there is a 57 on the bottle.

Wrigley’s gum was the first product to have a bar code.

Charles Jung invented the fortune cookie in 1918 in America.

If you chew gum while peeling onions you shouldn’t tear up.

California and Arizona produce 95% of America’s entire lemon crop.

In the American Civil War, acorns were used as a substitute for coffee.

 

Grilled Salmon

Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ lbs salmon fillet
  • lemon pepper to taste
  • garlic powder to taste
  • salt to taste
  • ⅓ cup soy sauce
  • ⅓ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup water
  • ⅓ cup vegetable oil

 

Directions

Season salmon fillets with lemon pepper, garlic powder and salt.  In a small bowl stir together soy sauce, brown sugar, water and vegetable oil until sugar is dissolved.  Place fish in a large sealable plastic bag with the soy sauce mixture, seal and turn to coat.  Refrigerate for at least 2 hours.

Preheat grill for medium heat.  Lightly oil grill grate. Place salmon on the preheated grill, and discard marinade. Cook salmon for 6 to 8 minutes per side, or until the fish flakes easily with a fork.

 

 

Crock Pot Bison Chili

Ingredients

  • 2 ½ cups dry red kidney beans (soaked overnight in 2 quarts of water)
  • 4 Tablespoons chili powder
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 ½ cups finely chopped yellow onion (2 medium)
  • 2 lbs ground bison
  • 1 can diced plum tomatoes (28 oz – 796 ml. size)
  • 1 can tomato sauce (23 oz – 680 ml. size)
  • 1 small can tomato paste (5.5 oz – 156 ml. size)
  • 1 teaspoon salt

 

Directions

Combine chili powder, cumin, coriander, garlic powder, oregano, and cayenne in a small bowl and set aside.

Put vegetable oil in large saucepan.  Heat over medium-high heat, add onions and sauté for 2 minutes.  Sprinkle in set aside spices, stir to combine with onions.  Let sizzle for a minute or two, or until the aroma from cooking spices becomes quite noticeable.

Immediately add the ground bison.  Cook, stirring occasionally until the meat has completely browned, about 5 to 7 minutes.  Transfer saucepan contents to the crock pot.  Drain the kidney beans.

Add kidney beans to the crock pot along with the plum tomatoes, tomato sauce, and tomato paste.  Sprinkle in salt.  Stir to combine all ingredients.

Cover and set on high heat.  Serve in a bowl.
For light red kidney beans, cook the chili a minimum of 8 ½ hours; for dark red kidney beans no less than 10 hours is required.

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