Surfs Up!

Welcome back travelers and foodie lovers to this week’s The Traveling Foody Blog.  The past 3 weeks we have been up and down the Southern parts of California, in and out of Mexico and South America.   I figure we talk a bit about beaches around the world and the surf culture which it inhabits.  Growing up surfing and being exposed to the beach life, I will always have a place in my heart for such things and a connection to the people, language, fashion, music, sport, food and art.  What does beach life and surfer culture mean to me?  It means I’m free; one with Mother Nature and at home.  Two highlights when I surf are being able to swim with smart and fascinating animals and the meal to replenish the body after a workout with the surf.  I still get slack from friends and people for saying, “Dude” and, “Stoked” in every sentence.  But I don’t mind.  It’s these types of things that make us who we are.

 

The history of surfing is rich in culture and can be traced back to the ancient Polynesians.   The modern popularity and culture of surfing began to burgeon during the 1950’s and 60’s in Hawaii, California and Australia.  Then, the surf culture began to affect fashion, literature, films and music.  Given that surfing on the oceans has a restricted geographical necessity (i.e. the coastline), the culture of beach life often subjected the surfers and vice versa.  In the 60’s, the surf culture of Southern California popularized the bikini, board shorts, the woodie wagon and of course music such as the Beach Boys and Dick Dale.  Surfing has also influenced the creation of new sports such as skateboarding and snowboarding.  When the waves were down, the surfers needed to continue their flow with the sea but they only had asphalt so they attached wheels to a smaller board and called it Skateboarding.

 

I love surfing and chilling around the Southern regions of California and Baja.  Here are a few beaches The Traveling Foody crew loves and recommends:

 

Bells Beach (Victoria, Australia)

Home of the Rip Curl Pro and featured in the movie Point Break and 1966s The Endless Summer.

Lover’s Beach (Baja, California Sur, Mexico)

This hidden cove with rock formations springing out makes for an excellent destination for the romantics.

Byron Bay (Australia)

Byron Bay is not only known for the surf but the pubs, cafés and the music scene.

Pipeline (Oahu, Hawaii)

Known for the reef breaks the beach offers some of the most amazing and beautiful curls in the surf.

An Bang Beach (Hoi An, Vietnam)

An Bang Beach offers soft waves and beautiful white sand.

Southwestern Beach (Koh Rong, Cambodia)

One of top beaches that the Gulf of Thailand with over 5,000 meters of untouched white sand.

Sun Island Beach (Maldives)

Some people might say this would be the best beach.  In the middle of the Indian Ocean this gem will take your breath away with the coral reefs being visible from the beach.

Nungwi (Zanzibar)

The shallow waters of Nungwi’s shores will have you thinking you can walk on water.

 

For more information visit us on facebook or at www.thetravelingfoody.com

I like to leave you with a refreshing Shellfish Watermelon Ceviche.

Shellfish Watermelon Ceviche

6 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 navel orange
  • ½ cup fresh orange juice Plus 1 Tablespoon
  • ¼ cup fresh lime juice
  • ½ cup diced seeded watermelon
  • ½ teaspoon finely grated peeled ginger
  • 1 ½ Tablespoons finely diced red onion
  • 2  teaspoons finely chopped fresh jalapeño
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ lb sea scallops cut into ½ inch pieces
  • ¼ lb large shrimp in shell, peeled, deveined, and cut into ½ inch pieces
  • ¼ lb cooked lobster meat, cut into ½ inch pieces
  • 1 ½ Tablespoons chopped fresh mint

 

Directions:

Cut, peel and remove segments of the orange free from membranes. Chop enough segments to measure ¼ cup.  Stir together chopped orange, orange juice, lime juice, watermelon, ginger, onion, jalapeño, and salt (to taste) in a large bowl.  Bring a 1-quart saucepan three-fourths full of water (Seasoned with salt) to a boil and add scallops.  Reduce heat to a simmer and poach scallops until just cooked through, about 1 minute. Transfer using a slotted spoon to a bowl of ice and cold water to stop cooking.  Bring water in saucepan to a boil and poach shrimp the same as scallops.  Drain the shrimp in a colander and transfer to bowl of ice and cold water to stop cooking. Drain scallops and shrimp well and pat dry.  Add scallops, shrimp, lobster, and mint to watermelon mixture and toss to combine, then season with salt.  Covered and chill at least 1 hour.

 

-Damien – The Traveling Foody

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