Posts Tagged With: America

The Traveling Foody – Super Bowl Party Fun Time Extravaganza

Welcome travelers and food lovers to this week’s blog.  It’s not just another day in America.  It’s Super Bowl time.  For those of you that are not up to speed on what the Super Bowl is, it’s the final winner take all game for the National Football League.  The Super Bowl parties have grown to a scale of hundreds of millions of viewers.  Why?  For the game?  For the funny commercials?  Or is it the entertainment?  The Super Bowl party is one of the major entertaining parties of the year.  The fans, commercials, food.  Oh yeah… There is the game to.  The great thing about this type of party is that it’s relatively easy going for the host(s) and the guests.  So don’t hold back on the TVs in every room and the copious and various types of food and drinks. The high strung competition level during the Super Bowl brings out the best in everyone.

Food Tips:

  • Do as much as you can ahead of time as you can.  This will give you more time to entertain.
  • Raw vegetables are a healthy choice and easy to prepare.
  • Finger foods are a hit and can be prepared the day before.
  • Crock-Pots are a great way to keep food warm.
  • Chicken wings are always a fan favorite for the party.
  • A nacho bar is a tasty and an inexpensive treat to feed the crowd.

As requested by the Traveling Foody family and friends we will be providing the party goers with elk meatballs.  One will be with a cranberry chili sauce and the other with a root beer bbq sauce.  Both are very special and very yummy.  Below is the recipe for the elk meatballs in cranberry chili sauce.  You can make the root beer bbq sauce the same way by combining 1 part of your favorite root beer and 1 part bbq sauce. This recipe and others can be found in our book Around the World in 80 Recipes, which can be purchased at http://www.amazon.com/Damien-T.-De-Witte/e/B0080YZEU4 in both hard copy and Kindle formats.

Elk Meatballs with Cranberry Chili Sauce

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs Elk meat or combine 1 lb ground elk and 1 lb ground pork
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • ½ cup dry Italian bread crumbs
  • ¼ cup onion, finely chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon catsup
  • 2 Tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 Tablespoon dried basil
  • 1 Tablespoon salt
  • ¼ Tablespoon pepper 

Sauce Ingredients

  • 1 (10 oz) Heinz Chili Sauce
  • 1 (10 oz) Ocean Spray Jellied Cranberry sauce

Directions

In a bowl, combine meatball ingredients; mix well.  Shape into 1-inch balls.  Place on rack in shallow roasting pan.  Bake at 350°F 10 to 15 minutes.  Remove meatballs.  

Combine jelly and chili sauce in 3-quart saucepan.  Cook over medium heat until jelly is melted, stirring to mix well. Add meatballs. Simmer for ½ hour on stovetop or place in crockpot on high for 1 hour or low for 2 hours.

-Damien – The Traveling Foody

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The Traveling Foody – North Oregon Coast Unveiled

Welcome wonderful travelers and food enthusiasts to this week’s blog.   This week we visited some amazing towns on the North Oregon coast.  Between the diversity of the culture and of the coastal line, the coast does not disappoint.  The winter time is a wonderful time to visit the Oregon coast.  Not only is it off season but, the beach offers an array of visual stimulation.  The ocean has drastic features that will insist that you are watching.  The weather was mild during our visit.

We first arrived at our wonderful cottage at the Hillcrest.  The main reason we stayed at the cottage was it’s location to Broadway and the beach.  I didn’t want anything right smack in the middle of everything and we were not disappointed.  Even though the cottage was not directly on the beach it was a small block away.  The staffs at the Hillcrest are amazingly accommodating.  They offered us a few tips at some foodie places and were spot on.  Although, there are many places to stay on the prom in Seaside, there are few that give you that old style 1970’s beach apartment feel.  You know, the type of “Three’s Company” vibe and structure where in one of the two bedrooms the closet has a doorway to the closet in the living room.

Our trip takes us through Seaside, Ecola State Park, CannonBeach, Oswald State Park, through Wheeler, Tillamook Bay and into Tillamook.  Seaside is a popular destination with travelers and food and family attractions throughout the year.  One of the many highlights was waking up about 7am, drinking a cup of coffee, and walking on the beaches while watching the sunrise.

Bumper what? Bumper cars! That’s right.  Bumper cars.  Funland facilitates indoor electric bumper cars which twist this way and that.  Funland hosts hundreds of games to choose from and some really good pizza. Over 21?  Have a beer!  The 12 year old in you will come out when visiting Funland…. Either that or the good beer kicked in.

Ranked at seven on the Travel Channels “World’s Best Beaches,” CannonBeach is unlike most beaches in the world.  The beach is flat and goes on forever where the Northwest Territory stops right at the edge of the sand.  The rivers and streams from the mountains feed the Pacific Ocean with fresh cold water.  The monoliths are some of the largest in the world.  Haystack is the most famous of the monoliths and we captured some amazing footage for the Traveling Foody.   Some of our best footage was in and around Ecola State park where one location had a sizable film crew.   I then found myself describing the scenery using the best David Attenborough impersonations I could possibly do and many laughs were had.  That being said, Haystack and Astoria (a town north of Cannon beach), was the set location for “Point Break” and “Goonies.”

One morning we decided to head south and visit the town of Tillamook.  Tillamook is a well known place for their dairy and cheese making so we couldn’t wait to visit the factory.  Squeaky cheese and a homemade Tillamook grilled cheese sandwich were amazing.  The factory offers the visitors views of the cheese making processes and packaging.  While some were destined to try out their large selection of ice creams others were there for the jerky… That’s right.  They are also known for their jerky.  Down the street from the Tillamook factory was the Blue Heron French cheese company.  The farm is known for their brie.  The country story in front offers wine tasting, sandwiches and various products to experience.

You can’t travel without tasting the food and drink.  Here are a few places that are a must when visiting the areas.

Foodie places:

  • Norma’s Ocean Diner was amazing with their chowder.  The right balance between their clams and diced potatoes.
  • The Stand in Seaside provided an exciting Hispanic grilled infusion of flavors for the palate.  This was one of my highlights.
  • Tora Sushi Lounge satisfies your mind, body and taste buds.
  • Bill’s Tavern and Brewery in Cannon beach was amazing.  Normally I don’t find myself drinking stout but I was adventurous and it paid off.

“Wake up.”

“Check!”

“Go to Beach!”

“Already there.”

The Oregon coast is captivating fun and wild.  It will pull you into its canvas and before you know it you are a part of the scenery.  Pictures speak louder than words I hear.  Here are a few that we snapped in and around the areas.

423648_306307059490623_618809278_n574920_306307096157286_125760225_nseaside-eola-park-cannon-beach-2012-256.jpg12614_306304009490928_244190973_n33863_306317476156248_1266126072_n282930_306307802823882_34838365_n421068_306303516157644_286764196_n66458_306306266157369_986148331_n542971_306305319490797_406311863_n602927_306304926157503_570903805_n

-Damien – The Traveling Foody

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The Traveling Foody – Going Yachting

 A big hello to my fellow travelers and food lovers!  My name is David Dewey, and I am honored to be a part of The Traveling Foody.  It is my pleasure to occasionally share stories of my travels and scrumptious food experiences. Following is a short depiction of a recent yachting trip I took:

I spent a weekend aboard my buddy’s new 48 foot yacht.  This thing is a floating mansion; three staterooms, three “floors”, full kitchen and two helms with tons of knobs and switches and buttons to mess with.  This was the first real outing since he purchased the boat so it was kind of an experiment where we learned all about the navigation system, played with the autopilot and learned how to use maritime charts so we didn’t run aground while trusting the computer to take us from way-point to way-point   If you have never been at sea aboard such a big boat, picture a floating double wide mobile home with two huge diesel engines that consume upwards of 17 gallons of fuel per hour of use.  Dual 220 gallon tanks would yield roughly five round trips from Seattle to Victoria at a cruising speed of 12 knots.

Our destination for this trip was the San Juan Islands.  I had the option of waking up super early on a Friday and cruising the whole way from the Deschutes River where the boat is moored or sleeping in and meeting up with the boat at the Skyline Marina in Anacortes.  Option two sounded much better so I made the nearly 3 hour drive up north to meet up with the boat.  Two very important things were my responsibility:  breakfast for the whole crew and beer.  This was easy since I love both.  

Our first destination was Friday Harbor and the fastest route (about 2.5 hours) was to follow the San Juan ferry route.  Right off the bat we encountered a huge tanker ship, which looks fairly docile until you catch up to the wake.  These wakes are no less than 3-4 feet tall and it only takes one pass over them at full cruising speed to realize that NOTHING is secured well enough on board to do that again; although it was fun “jumping” the boat and seeing the kids that were with us suddenly become weightless in space as the boat moved around them in an extreme fashion.  We all laughed after getting over the adrenaline rush but decided that was probably not the best idea in the future….and for the record, everything spilled or got knocked over except the beers.  

We spent the day scouting landmarks and deciding where the scuba divers aboard were doing to drop in the water later in the weekend.  After some research we decided on Cascade Bay that resides within the huge inlet called East Sound on Orcas Island.  There is a huge drop-off just off shore here and supposedly some great marine wildlife to interact with.  The dark came quickly as it does in the fall as we approached the Friday Harbor Marina.  We spent a restful night here and rose early the next day to ensure we catch all the desirable sights.  Breakfast the next morning was homemade cherry pie and scrambled eggs.  Yum!

Cascade Bay:  After dropping in the super cool skiff and cruising around at top speed over the glass like water, we helped the divers get into their dry suits and into the water.  This was great practice for me; being in charge of this huge boat and now responsible for the divers’ safety.   I followed their bubbles in the water to keep track of them and waited for the standard 30-40 minutes (the tanks have about 45 minutes worth of air) then watched for them to surface.  They traveled pretty far from the boat so I had them wait where they were while I went to get them with the skiff.  We didn’t think this through very well and found it impossible to get them aboard the skiff with all the scuba gear on, so we decided to do it like the marines and have them grab a hold of the side as I dragged them back to the boat.  I was having fun with it, but they looked a bit nervous as the thought of losing grip and getting chopped up by the prop passed through their minds.  A few more laps on the skiff with the kids and it was time to head back to Friday Harbor again.  Along the way, we experienced the most glorious and vibrantly colored sun set I do believe I have ever seen.  It is impossible to describe in short length but I will say I was so taken by the beauty that I got all watery eyed with a huge smile while enjoying the multi-colored puffy clouds and the incredibly contoured horizon of the mountains and the ocean.

Sunday:  I rose early and prepared my ultimate breakfast; Hobo Hash.  This has everything you love about breakfast scrambles but I do it up all gourmet with lots of herbs and spices and more.  The crew awoke to Pink Floyd’s, Dark Side of the Moon album blasting in the cabins and the aromas of fresh coffee and breakfast cooking.  Today was a day for exploration.  We visited Blind Island State Park, which is only accessible by boat.  There are no docks, only beaches, so a skiff is necessary.  This park is absolutely pristine.  Small, but big enough to spend several hours hiking on their manicured trails; which is exactly what we did.  Enjoyed a nice picnic there and set out to do some more diving.  The rest of the day was taken up by traveling back to the dive spot where we sent them out to see if they could find anything else cool and exciting.  

Unfortunately this was the last day I could spend aboard, so we slowly made our way back south to Skyline Marina.  I spent a good portion of my young life aboard much smaller boats and sailed a couple times, but this was a new experience.  I learned a ton about navigation techniques and diver safety.  Maybe someday my buddy will appoint me the title Number One, so I can “Make it so.”

-David – A fellow traveling foody

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The Traveling Foody – Oktoberfest!

Welcome travelers and food lovers to this week’s blog.  It’s a rocking Oktoberfest.  We have been very busy towards the end of this year so some of our blogs you will notice a week gap here and there.  We are gearing up to finalize the Foodie Pet book which has been a blast but taking up more of our time due to our high standards in our product.  That being said, let’s rock this Oktoberfest.

Our own Traveling Foody’s David Dewey, will be experiencing some amazing American Oktoberfest parties in Leavenworth, Washington.  Although not as big as Munich and other cities throughout America, Leavenworth does not disappoint with its beautiful Bavarian style village and surrounding mountains.  In America, the larger festivals are held in various areas of Ohio, Wisconsin and Minnesota.  The largest festival in the world is held in Munich, Germany.

What is the true story behind Oktoberfest?  Well, Oktoberfest is a 16 day festival also known to the locals in Munich as “die Wiesn” – named after the fairgrounds in where it is held in the Bavarian city of Theresienwiese.  It all started back on October 12th 1810, when Crown Price Ludwig – later to become King Ludwig I – was to marry Princess Therese Charlotte Luise of Saxony-Hildburghausen. The people of Munich were all invited to the festivities which were held in the fields by the city gates.  The fields were then named after the Princes and have kept their name ever since.  The festival was later moved into September to allow for better weather conditions.

Only the beer conforming to Reineitsgebot standards (Purity laws), can be served at Oktoberfest.  The beer is required to be brewed within Munich’s city limits and the breweries that can produce must do so under particular criteria.  We salute the following breweries for making world class biers:

Augustiner-Brau

Hacker-Pschorr-Brau

Lowenbra

Paulaner-Brau

Splatenbrau

Staatliches Hofbrau-Munchen

 

Some fun facts and tips for you:

  • The marquees get very crowded.  You need to purchase vouchers in advance in order to get a place to eat and drink.
  • Over 6.6 million liters of beer is consumed.
  • Be sure to book your hotel room 1 year in advance.
  • Food in the marquees is more expensive than the stands in other parts of the park.
  • Landlords are able to charge their guests for using their toilets.

 

Today we leave you with one of our favorite German treats: Kartoffelknödeln  This recipe and others can be found purchasing at http://www.amazon.com/Damien-T.-De-Witte/e/B0080YZEU4 both in hard copy and Kindle format.

 

Kartoffelknödeln (Potato Dumplings)

Makes 2 dozen

Ingredients

  • 8 medium potatoes
  • 3 egg yolks, beaten
  • 3 Tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 cup bread crumbs
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • 1½ teaspoons salt
  • Flour

Directions

Peel the potatoes.  Place them into a large pot and fill the pot with enough water to cover them.

Bring the water to a boil, lower the heat, and simmer until the potatoes are soft (about 20–30 minutes).  Drain the potatoes well in a colander, place them in a bowl, and mash them, using a hand mixer or potato masher.   Add the egg yolks, cornstarch, breadcrumbs, salt and pepper.

Rinse out the pot and refill it with water and heat to boiling.  While the water is heating, shape the potato mixture into golf-ball sized dumplings.  Roll the dumplings in flour and drop immediately into boiling water for 15 to 20 minutes.  Serve with butter and salt.

-Damien – The Traveling Foody

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The Traveling Foody – Tailgating

Hey there travelers and foodie fans.   Welcome to this week’s adventure.  It’s that time of year when Americans gather for two things; Tailgating and the various sporting events that follow.   Not everyone can get into the stadium to experience the game and oddly enough, many don’t even want to.  Those are the hardcore tailgaters.  They are the ones who arrive early to the party and thrive off the divine showing of their flare.  That’s right, Tailgaters.  It’s all about the crazy social event packed with amazing vehicles which strap on and let loose the power of the party.  Between the grilling madness, TV’s and sound systems battered off the generator, and the various alcohol infused fun, a tailgating party is like no other party.

If there is one person you need to answer any questions about tailgating, it’s this man; Joe Cahn, the self-declared Commissioner of Tailgating.  This guy is the epitome of hardcore and the Traveling Foody team has so much respect and love for the man.  He has traveled all over the United States tailgating and sharing his love and passion for the event by sharing food and stories with various fans.  We here at the Traveling Foody salute you, Joe Cahn.

When your vehicle is parked and tents and grilling apparatuses are ready, it’s time for a few games to work up that appetite.  Some of our favorite games to play at a tailgating party are beer pong, flip cup, corn hole and ladder toss.  We will leave you to investigate the explanation of the game titles.  Now that you have played the game and have created that appetite, it’s time to eat.  The old style tailgating brought you some great foods such as hamburgers, hot dogs, coleslaw and potato salad.  With modern technology, bringing the house to the tailgate is easier than ever. Plus it’s a convenient way to show you’re off your rig and cooking skills to the masses.  If you are lucky you could find yourself participating, watching or tasting the wonders of a tailgating cook off.

I like to leave you with a couple recipes this week that will surely impress the hardest of the hardcore tailgating foodie.  First, a Black Bean and Granny Smith Salad that will rock the tailgaters taste buds.  The recipe can be doubled, tripled, etc… And finally we have the Grilled Mussels with Red Pepper Relish.

Thank you all for stopping buy and I look forward to your wonderful likes, reposts, responses and emails each and every week.  Keep on traveling and exploring food and cultures!

 

Black Bean and Granny Smith Apple Salad

4 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 pinch cayenne pepper
  • 2 (15 ounce) cans black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 2 Granny Smith apples, unpeeled, cored, and chopped
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro

Directions

Heat the oil in a skillet over medium heat.  Cook and stir the onion and red bell pepper in the hot oil until the onion has softened and turned translucent, about 5 minutes; season with cumin, salt, and cayenne pepper.  Scrape into a mixing bowl; stir in the black beans, apples, lemon juice, and cilantro.  Refrigerate until cold before serving.

 

Grilled Mussels with Red Pepper Relish

Serves 4 – 6

Ingredients:

  • 3 red bell peppers
  • 3 slices of bacon
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 24 mussels, cleaned
  • ½ head red leaf lettuce

Directions:

Roast the bell peppers on the grill over high heat for 4 – 7 minutes, rotating so that all sides get toasted.  Put the pepper into a plastic or paper bag for 8 minutes.  Peel away the skin, discard the seeds and stems, and chop the peppers finely.  Cook the bacon in a pan on the stove until crisp, crumble, and combine with peppers.  Toss the mixture with the vinegar. 

Grill the mussels over heat until they pop open, 3 – 5 minutes. Put a spoonful of the relish in each mussel and serve over the lettuce leaves.  Do not eat any unopened mussels.

 

-Damien – The Traveling Foody

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Let’s Go To The Fair!

Hello all you traveling Foodie lovers.  This week we are talking about going to the fair.  Fairs are a meeting grounds for everything human culture.  Fairs have been around for many years.  It’s all about the show casing.  From arts and crafts, live stock and farming techniques to the crazy foods.  Which type of foods?  Well these days it’s not only fresh but its deep-fried.  Trends evolve from year to year at the state, county and global fairs.

The first fair in the world is not exactly known.  However, the chronicles of mankind are filled with references to fairs, not in an institutional context, but as a part of everyday communal interaction.  Indication in scriptures point to the existence of fairs as early as 500 BC.  Merchants from all over the countries would come together to trade regional goods and native wares.  Later, entertainment and other forms of activity were added to gatherings making them into the fairs that we recognize today.  In 1765, the first Northern American fair was presented in Windsor, Nova Scotia.  Elkanah Watson, from New England, earned the title, “Father of US agricultural fairs” by organizing the Berkshire Agricultural Society.  He created the Cattle Show in Pittsfield, Massachusetts in September 1811.  Today there are more than 3,200 fairs in North America alone, bringing people closure together to share and learn about the agriculture and domestic products.

Let’s not forget about the foods of the fair.  Between all the exhibits and competitions, people get hungry and they want food.  What kind of foods?  Well, it seems every so often fairs foods start a new trend.  Right now it’s everything on a stick and something being deep fried.  Let’s not forget about the classic funnel cake or some local ice cream.  Some of the more interesting treats we have tried were hash brown covered hot dogs, or a banana rolled in a flour tortilla and then deep fried.  Have you ever tried fried beer?  Or fried coke? How about a fried Twinkie?  Next time you are at the fair, explore some of the more interesting foodie goodness.

 

With so many fairs all over the globe I know that many of you will find one close to you.  I’d like to leave you lovely foodies with a corn dog recipe and funnel cakes.

 

Corn Dog

Ingredients

  • 1 quart oil for deep frying
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2/3 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 1/4 cup white sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons bacon drippings
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 1/4 cups buttermilk
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 pounds hot dogs
  • wooden sticks

 

Directions:

Heat oil in a deep fryer to 365 degrees F (185 degrees C).  In a large bowl, stir together the flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder and salt. Stir in bacon drippings.  Make a well in the center, and pour in the egg, buttermilk, and baking soda.  Mix until everything is smooth and well blended.  Insert wooden sticks into the ends.  Dip the hot dogs in the batter one at a time, shaking off the excess.  Deep fry a few at a time in the hot oil until they are as brown as you like them.  Drain on paper towels and serve.

 

Funnel Cake

Ingredients:

  • 8 cups vegetable oil for frying
  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup confectioners’ sugar

 

Directions:

In a deep-fryer, or heavy skillet, heat oil to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).  In a large bowl, beat milk and eggs together.  Combine flour, baking powder, cinnamon and salt.  Stir into the egg mixture until smooth.  While covering the funnel hole with one hand, pour in 1 cup of batter.  Start from the center in a swirling motion to make a 6 inch round.  Fry on both sides until golden brown.  Remove and drain on paper towels.  Sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar and serve warm.

 

-Damien – The Traveling Foody

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AMER I CAN!

Good day to all!  Welcome to this week’s The Traveling Foody blog.  It’s Amer I “can” not Amer I “can’t.”  Why am I talking this way?   Well, today many of us American’s are celebrating the adoption of our independence.  With the invention of the internet we are able to share what this day means to us and to other nations.  It’s an awesome feeling to be free and be able to open up and share knowledge and culture between people from all nations.  I like to invite all our travelers and Foody lovers all over the globe to celebrate with us the joy each other’s stories and recipes which will bring all of us closer together.  I must add that I am grateful for my life on this beautiful earth and being able to share this earth with you, my family and friends.

 

North American food is as diverse as the land. In recent years North America has seen more sustainable farms popping up and pushing away from corporate and government subsidized farming.  People are willing to pay a little more for quality local foods.  The turn of the 19th and 20th centuries brought to light an influx of immigrants who developed a rich assortment of food preparation throughout the region.  From the Pacific coast to the Atlantic, North America has been a melting pot of cultures.  The vast rich farmland of North America provides people the perfect conditions for farming various fruits, grains, vegetables, and livestock.  The Pacific and Atlantic oceans also provide people with bountiful treats from the sea.  The combination of the North American topography and culture will astound the traveler.  North American cuisine will continue to fuse new and old traditions.

I would like to share with you some strange facts about food and about America.  Included in this week’s blog are recipes from the North American section of my book, Around the World in 80 Recipes.  Thank you to my good friends, Ben and Rachel Shelton, for letting us use their kitchen and for the beautiful photos they were able to capture for the book.

You can purchase the book at http://www.amazon.com/Damien-T.-De-Witte/e/B0080YZEU4.  For more information on upcoming books visit http://thetravelingfoody.com.

 

Strange facts:

Apple rock!  Why?  They are more efficient at waking you up in the morning.

There were 57 varieties of pickles Heinz ketchup produced.  Now you know why there is a 57 on the bottle.

Wrigley’s gum was the first product to have a bar code.

Charles Jung invented the fortune cookie in 1918 in America.

If you chew gum while peeling onions you shouldn’t tear up.

California and Arizona produce 95% of America’s entire lemon crop.

In the American Civil War, acorns were used as a substitute for coffee.

 

Grilled Salmon

Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ lbs salmon fillet
  • lemon pepper to taste
  • garlic powder to taste
  • salt to taste
  • ⅓ cup soy sauce
  • ⅓ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup water
  • ⅓ cup vegetable oil

 

Directions

Season salmon fillets with lemon pepper, garlic powder and salt.  In a small bowl stir together soy sauce, brown sugar, water and vegetable oil until sugar is dissolved.  Place fish in a large sealable plastic bag with the soy sauce mixture, seal and turn to coat.  Refrigerate for at least 2 hours.

Preheat grill for medium heat.  Lightly oil grill grate. Place salmon on the preheated grill, and discard marinade. Cook salmon for 6 to 8 minutes per side, or until the fish flakes easily with a fork.

 

 

Crock Pot Bison Chili

Ingredients

  • 2 ½ cups dry red kidney beans (soaked overnight in 2 quarts of water)
  • 4 Tablespoons chili powder
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 ½ cups finely chopped yellow onion (2 medium)
  • 2 lbs ground bison
  • 1 can diced plum tomatoes (28 oz – 796 ml. size)
  • 1 can tomato sauce (23 oz – 680 ml. size)
  • 1 small can tomato paste (5.5 oz – 156 ml. size)
  • 1 teaspoon salt

 

Directions

Combine chili powder, cumin, coriander, garlic powder, oregano, and cayenne in a small bowl and set aside.

Put vegetable oil in large saucepan.  Heat over medium-high heat, add onions and sauté for 2 minutes.  Sprinkle in set aside spices, stir to combine with onions.  Let sizzle for a minute or two, or until the aroma from cooking spices becomes quite noticeable.

Immediately add the ground bison.  Cook, stirring occasionally until the meat has completely browned, about 5 to 7 minutes.  Transfer saucepan contents to the crock pot.  Drain the kidney beans.

Add kidney beans to the crock pot along with the plum tomatoes, tomato sauce, and tomato paste.  Sprinkle in salt.  Stir to combine all ingredients.

Cover and set on high heat.  Serve in a bowl.
For light red kidney beans, cook the chili a minimum of 8 ½ hours; for dark red kidney beans no less than 10 hours is required.

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